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Finally! Even the Media Lose Faith in Kenyan Politicians

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We
can’t expect riots in the streets just yet, but even the
Daily
Nation

has fallen out of love with the politicians
of the Grant Coalition,
who promised so much but have delivered so little since the
settlement after the post-election violence last year. On Friday, in
a piece by Emeka-Mayaka Kekara, the scales finally fell from
journalists’ eyes as they realised that the Kenyan public had been
conned yet again.

Apparently,
a “paltry” 20% of Kenyans think that the governmeng is doing its
job at present; I class that as a full 20% of people surveyed who
should be under the care of a mental health professional. Does
Mathere hospital have enough beds to take them all? Are these passing
delusions, or more powerful hallucinations? Are the drugs they have
been taking available to the general public?

The
press, the Fourth Estate, those who are trusted to bring us the news
as to what our elected representatives have been doing in our names –
even they have grown disillusioned with the moribund performance of
the legislature. Our stock market is in crisis, we can’t feed our own
people, and corruption contines to stalk the land. Yet instead of
addressing these issues and constructing emergency measures that will
be good for the country as a whole, our benevolent leaders have
instead instituted yet another talking shop to discuss “The Kenya
We Want” while the majority of the populace suffers.

I’ll
tell you what Kenyan citizens want: we want our MPs to justify their
extortionate salaries by passing measures for the good of Kenyan
society. We want food aid to be distributed to those who need it, not
those who can finagle a government contract. We want security to
carry out our legitmate business without fear of carjacking or
gun-toting gangsters. We want our Mps to pay a fair amount of tax.
Above all, we want to live in an equitable society that can be built
on, rather than chipped away from the bottom.

Despite
all of the slogans from the last two national election campaigns,
Kenya has been saddled with the dregs of the Kanu age, and there has
been no real change. The new generation of political candidates who
promised change have either been co-opted into the sleaze and scandal
of the status quo or marginalised to the point of irrelevance.
Nothing, really has changed. We Kenyans have been sold a lemon, yet
it is so rotten and worm-ridden that we cannot even make lemonade.

What
is needed is a full-scale revolution. A sweeping-out of the old in
order to bring in the new. True, it would be a gamble to presume that
they would be any better. But the fact remains that we are dealing
with the ghosts of Kenyas past right now, and nothing seems to be
improving. What we should be looking for are the ghosts of Kenya
present and future. We need leaders who will guide us to the 2030
goals without bankrupting or leaving behind a chunk of the populace.
We need leaders who are more concerned with the greater good than the
latest Mercedes limousine. We need leaders of the sort that we simply
don’t have at the moment. We need to find those new leaders, and
champion them immediately, to prepare for the fight ahead.

[Image by DrinksMachine]

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